Twitter's Weird Plan to Become an Online Shopping Mall

The popular social-messaging service is partnering with American Express to let you make purchases just by tweeting. Twitter, in its seemingly endless quest to effectively monetize itself, is looking across the Internet to Amazon for a little inspiration. The social-messaging network now wants to become something of an e-tailer, and is partnering with American Express to let consumers purchase products by — you guessed it — tweeting.

The project is still in the experimental phase, but so far, here's what The Week knows about how Amex Sync would work: Retailers would make deals with Twitter to sell specific products and services at a discount to Twitter users. Then on the consumer end, you'd link your Amex credit card with your Twitter handle. Once signed in, you'd send a tweet containing a special hashtag to make a purchase, something like #BuyAmexGiftCard25. A reply to @AmexSync confirms the purchase, and — tada! — you are now the owner of a $25 American Express Gift Card.

Twitter believes this initiative could help the company diversify its revenue streams, which are currently heavily reliant on online advertising. "We're convinced that commerce is going to be one of the areas (for which) advertisers are going to start using our platform," Joel Lunenfeld, Twitter’s vice president of global brand strategy, told The Wall Street Journal. It's unclear, however, if or how much of a cut Twitter will take from each transaction.

But tweets could just be the beginning. According to All Things D, Amex is bringing the initiative over to Facebook, Foursquare, and Microsoft's Xbox Live, too.

So what's in it for you? Discounts on a range of products — Amex gift cards, Kindle Fire tablets from Amazon, jewelry from designer Donna Karan, and the like. Of course, that means you'll have to openly advertise to your followers what it is you're buying, which many consumers will understandably see as a dealbreaker.

For marketers, it establishes that almighty link between the mysterious value of a tweet and a measurable purchase at the end of the online retail funnel. Expect the service to roll out slowly over the next few days
- As seen in The Week
Brought to you by
NetLingo: Improve Your Internet IQ
Subscribe to the NetLingo Blog via Email or RSS

The Dark Side of Meeting People Online

Not a day goes by in New York City that I don't hear about some kind of abduction. But when it happens because people get to know each other online and then meet in real life, I must report on it so you know the dangers, even if you're an adult!

According to Alison Bowen of Metro New York, police are searching for a suspect they think may have murdered a Queens teacher after they met online. David Rangel, 53, was found choked to death and shoved under his couch in his Jackson Heights apartment Sunday, officials said. A police spokesman said cops responded to a 911 call, after a friend checking on him found the door unlocked and ajar.
Police found Rangel with trauma to his head and blood on the floor and the walls. Councilman Daniel Dromm asked the NYPD to investigate the murder as a hate crime. “The horrific crime committed against David Rangel, an openly gay public school teacher who lived in one of the city's most tolerant communities, is deeply distressing,” Dromm said. Dromm spokesman Alex Florez said Rangel appears to have met someone online. The councilman's concern is that someone may have targeted him because he is openly gay, and that this perhaps led into a potential bias-motivated murder. “Something obviously went terribly wrong there,” Florez said. Rangel taught seventh- and eighth-grade Spanish at P.S. 219. “We are deeply saddened by the loss of a well-liked and respected teacher, David Rangel,” the school’s president, Fred Wright, wrote on Twitter yesterday.

Meanwhile, the family of a Staten Island woman, Sarai Sierra, is searching for her in Turkey, where she disappeared while traveling this month. They, too, are concerned she may have met someone online. She had planned to meet with strangers she met through Instagram, according to the Daily News. Online safety expert Hemu Nigam said that when people sit behind a computer screen, they may wrongly lower their guard.

“When you’re going online, it’s very much like you’re going down a New York alley,” he said. “You don’t know where you’re going, you don’t know what might pop up … yet when you’re on a computer, you do it without thinking twice.”
“If you’re connecting with somebody in the online world, unless you are seeing the whites of their eyes, they should be treated as a stranger to you,” Nigam said. Instead, he said, when people talk online, they can feel very comfortable, because they are in the comfort of their own home. But people should have the opposite reaction. If something seems off, ask for clarification, he advised. “I think your first best friend in all of this is Google,” he said. “You can see if the job they’re talking about actually exists. … if your instincts say there’s something wrong, you’ve got to go with it.”

He also suggests a face-to-face chat on the computer or phone. “If the person refuses because they’re giving you examples like, ‘My hair doesn’t look good today, I’m just not feeling well,’ your senses should go up,” he said. If you do meet someone, perhaps through an online dating website, make sure it is in a public place, and consider having a friend show up two or three tables down or suggesting a group setting.

- As seen in Metro New York Brought to you by NetLingo: Improve Your Internet IQ
Subscribe to the NetLingo Blog via Email or RSS